Market Appraisals For Eastern Bays/Remuera Homes – The Truth About Them and Market Value

Updated 9 April 2019

Disclaimer: the views expressed in this article do not represent the views of Megan Jaffe Real Estate (trading as Ray White Remuera) or Ruoxi Wang (in her capacity as licensee salesperson). Always seek legal advice.

 

You’ve been eyeing an upgrade because there’s not enough space for your children. Or thinking about downsizing to a smaller single level home but preferably one with a view of Rangitoto and close enough to Mission Bay beach for the daily beach runs or walking distance to the St Heliers village for a lazy Sunday Brunch. 

That means you are ready to go on the market and sell your current home.

Of course, before going to market, it’s natural to want to know how much your home is worth and how much you can bank from the sale. Then you can work out your budget for your next dream home. All very sensible.

What's My House Worth?

There are a few ways to find out what your home is worth:

Or do all three. (Just don’t look solely at CV – I’ve covered ‘why not’ extensively here.)

Now you may start to wonder:

  1. why do all of the values seem to differ and sometimes so wildly? 
  2. should I trust the salesperson who gave the highest appraised value?
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The short answer to the first question is this.
“Value is simply an opinion.” Seriously.

Things that have memories and stories are worth more to you than to others who attach no meaning to them. 

Just like how my house has this absolutely atrocious painting by my husband (proof is in the picture). To me it’s special because he said it was the sunset he saw while taking Rambo out for his first walk at Churchill Park but I’m not quite sure others are prepared to hang that up for display. 

I am sure you now understand instinctively why ‘Value’ is such an individual & personal opinion – what something is worth to you or your family can be completely different from what it’s worth to the next person – especially for things that hold an emotional connection.

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Nobody can tell you accurately what your property will sell for.

I do not have a crystal ball. And neither does the next real estate salesperson, independent valuer or the automated valuation websites. Nobody can pinpoint exactly what somebody else’s personal and subjective opinion of value of your house may be. At best they can make an educated guess. 

House price, Buying Property, Selling Property, Kohimarama, Glendowie, Orakei, Mission Bay, Remuera, St Heliers, Real Estate Agent, Property ruoxi wang

What appraisals do (similar to independent valuations) is to look back at comparable sales of similar homes in your area, and based on those comparable sales and the characteristics/condition of your home, come to a ‘best guess’ of what it can possibly fetch in the market today assuming that there is a similar buyer out there. In short, it is based on historic figures and incorporates certain projections and assumptions.

To make things more challenging, other than the home itself, there are other variables to ‘value’. Here are some examples:

  • Neighborhood characteristics (Are your neighbours houses’ equally nice and tidy? Is it a tree-lined street and close to parks? Some streets are better than others for e.g. Kesteven Avenue, Riddell Road and Kildare Avenue are popular streets in Glendowie)
  • Zoning classification and description under the Unitary Plan. Is there potential for future development and will buyers value it? Will the sea view towards Brown Island and Rangitoto be unobstructed or likely to be built out by intensification of land use?
  • Available public or private utilities like good schools (Glendowie Primary, St Heliers School, Double Grammar Zone etc), great shopping areas (e.g. St Heliers Village) etc

Because so many factors play into a home’s appraised value, there is huge subjectivity in the process. What matters to one buyer may not matter at all to another (or becomes a downside). For example, some buyers love old villa styles while others prefer more modern architecture. One buyer’s circumstance (for e.g. new baby on the way or job change) may necessitate him/her buying a house at THAT time even if it means paying more (sometimes, a lot more). However, that buyer may not exist for your home when you come to sell.

Ultimately, you need to remember this. In the sale of your home, there are only 2 opinions that matter: Yours as the seller, and that of the best buyer.

So should you pick the salesperson that gave the highest appraised price?

As with all things in life, it depends.

As I explained above, we as salespersons take an educated guess as to what your home will sell for based on comparable sales and what we see in the market.

What do you do when you receive appraisals from different salespersons that have huge variance?

  1. You need to look closely at the comparables the salesperson has provided and see if these are similar to what the other salespersons have given. 
  2. Are the comparables the same? If they are, ask the salesperson to explain how he/she arrived at a much higher price than the rest despite having the same comparables. Is it because your house has stunning expansive sea views or  it backs onto Churchill Park or that the location is literally a stone’s throw away from St Heliers village? Has the salesperson captured something that the other salespeople did not see?
  3. If the comparables are different, is there any reason whereby the salesperson picked those comparables and are they really similar to your house or is it a bit of a stretch? Be your harshest critic here – it is your most valuable asset but you need to have an accurate understanding of where your property stands. 

And even then, it is still a guess!

What really matters and what you should do.

I will repeat what I’ve said above. In the sale of your home, there are only 2 opinions that matter: Yours as the seller, and that of the best buyer

What you should therefore focus on is therefore finding the best buyer. And to find the best buyer, you need to maximise the buyer pool and therefore create buyer competition.

When interviewing your salesperson, ask these questions:

  • How do they plan to create competition amongst buyers for your home?
  • How do they plan to present your home in this digital age and the current market to obtain maximum possible interest?
  • Are they planning to use social media and search engines to drive interest? How so? Have they personally used them and spent lots of $$ on such advertising and understand intimately how it works?
  • Do they have the ability to change and adapt advertising copy on a constant basis to maximise eyeballs?
  • What are they going to do to attract as many qualified buyers as possible to your property?
  • What are the recommended most efficient and cost-effective marketing channels currently available?
  • How are they going to help those buyers create an emotional connection to your home? Are they going to be personally present and deal with each and every objection?
  • Have they got the multiple linguistic capabilities to deal with a wide range of buyers so that you capture every single possibility?

All the best in your sale, and I look forward to be of service!

Found this post useful and have more questions?

Very few real estate salesperson have a legal background. Work with someone who understands the ‘fine print’ so that you don’t have to. Better still, work with someone who also has a unique marketing campaign to maximise your chances of success. 

Do not hesitate to contact me for a no-obligation discussion over coffee on your future plans to either buy or sell. 

Disclaimer: Yes, I am a licensee salesperson under the REAA 2008, but I am not your salesperson and this article does not create any relationship between you and me (other than reader and author of course). All the information on this website is published in good faith, for general information purpose only and should not be seen as specific financial or investment advice. I do not make any warranties about the completeness, reliability and accuracy of this information. Any action you take upon the information you find on this website is strictly at your own risk. Copyright: The material contained in this website, including property information and images, may not be used in any way without the express permission of NZ Premium Homes or Ruoxi Wang.